Writing Their Scripts

30 Women You Need To Know15 Things You Did Not Know about the History of Black People in London before 1948
By Charmaine Simpson, December 2012

The presence of Africans in England dates back to at least the Roman period when African soldiers who served as part of the Roman army were stationed at Hadrian’s Wall during the 2nd century CE. Septimus Severus, the emperor who was born in Libya, spent his last three years in Britain before he died in York in 211 CE.

I will present 15 facts aimed at raising the level of knowledge, and uncovering the hidden histories, of people of African and Caribbean descent who have contributed to London before 1948.

1. The earliest known [public] record of a Black person living in London is of “Cornelius a Blackamoor” whose burial on 2nd March 1593 was recorded in the parish register at St Margaret’s Church in Lee. Continue reading

Advertisements

Going To Africa

White [r]acists have been funding black activists’ ‘Back to Africa’ movements

By Keisha N. Blain, 2016

One man’s GoFundMe dares racists to put their money where their mouth is

In a new twist on the age old racist call to “go back to Africa,” a black man in Indiana just created a GoFundMe page daring racists to cover his travel expenses to the continent. “If you want me to go back to Africa,” Larry Mitchell says, “I will gladly go.” Telling white racists to “put their money where their mouth is,” Mitchell called on members of the [Klan] and anyone else who shared their views to submit a donation.

It sounds like a stunt (and according to Mitchell it started as one), but for many years this kind of move was a real political strategy employed by black activists. Continue reading

Ben Hausa Ali – White Playing Hausa With Arabs

BREAKING News: Boko Haram Leader, Abubakar Shekau Claims ...THE MEMOIRS OF ABD-ALLAH AL-GHADEMISI OF KANO, 1903-1908.
PART I: THE BRITISH CONQUEST OF KANO
By MUHAMMAD SANI UMAR AND JOHN HUNWICK, in: Sudanic Africa, 7, 1996, 61-96

These native servants are the quintessence of loyalty, and devotion, and as time goes on, I am to find out that without them Nigeria would have been untenable by the white man. – F.P. Crozier, Five Years Hard, London 1932, 72-3.

Introduction
Some time in 1902 a young man named Abd-Allah arrived in Kano, ‘from the north’, presumably from Ghadames. We know nothing of the circumstances of his arrival, or of his ancestry. The document translated below is currently our only source of information on him. In it he describes himself as a ‘student’, but it is not clear in what sense he uses that term. There is no indication that he came to Kano to study, but we know that some years later he was acting as a clerk for his paternal uncles in Kano, who were evidently merchants. Continue reading

Hausa People

Gallery For > Ancient Hausa PeopleHausa

Location: Northern Nigeria, northwestern Niger
Population: 15 million
Language: Hausa
Neighboring Peoples: Kanuri, Fulani, Akan, Songhay, Yoruba

History
Origin myths among the Hausa claim that their founder, Bayajidda, came from the east in an effort to escape his father. He eventually came to Gaya, where he employed some blacksmiths to fashion a knife for him. With his knife he proceeded to Daura where he freed the people from the oppresive nature of a sacred snake who guarded their well and prevented them from getting water six days out of the week. The queen of Daura gave herself in marriage to Bayajidda to show her appreciation. She gave birth to seven healthy sons, each of whom ruled the seven city states that make up Hausaland. Continue reading

Gran Colombia

The division of Gran Colombia (1830).Gran Colombia
Alternative Titles: Great Colombia, Republic of Colombia, Republic of Gran Colombia

Gran Colombia, formal name Republic of Colombia, a short-lived republic (1819–30) formerly the Viceroyalty of New Granada, including roughly the modern nations of Colombia, Panama, Venezuela, and Ecuador.

In the context of their war for independence from Spain, revolutionary forces in northern South America, led by Simón Bolívar, in 1819 laid the basis for a regular government at a congress in Angostura (now Ciudad Bolívar, Venezuela).

Their republic was definitely organized at the Congress of Cúcuta in 1821. Before then the government had been military and highly centralized with direct executive power exercised by regional vice presidents while President Bolívar was campaigning. Continue reading

North Amexica

Where does North America begin?

There are common misconceptions about countries south of the USA.  for example always the same discussions about Mexico not being North America. Such a judgement might be coming from ignorance, but it is nevertheless interesting that this is a common interpretation.

Common Misconceptions – The position of Mexico

Many people don’t think that Mexico is part of North America. They think that it is instead a part of Central or South America. However, Mexico is “officially” or scholarly widely considered to be a part of North America. Have a look at this picture [above] which I extracted from a discussion on /r/mexico on reddit.com.

You can see what I want to refer to as argumentum ad aequatorem (following the style of some genetic fallacies). It basically states that Mexico has to be North America, since it lies north of the equator. Using the same assertions no less than 12 (!) other countries can claim to be a part of North America. From North to South: Belize, Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, Colombia, Vuvuzela Venezuela, Guyana, Suriname and French Guyana. Continue reading

Ideas for Marcus Garvey

Marcus Garvey25 Facts about Marcus Mosiah Garvey

1. Marcus Mosiah Garvey Jnr was born on 17 August 1887 in St Ann’s Bay, Jamaica. His parents were Malcus Mosiah Garvey Snr, a stone mason and Sarah Jane Richards, a domestic worker. The Garvey’s had 11 children, nine of whom died in early childhood. Only Marcus Garvey and his eldest sister Indiana lived to adulthood.

2. Marcus Mosiah Garvey’s first wife was Amy Ashwood Garvey (1897-1969). They married in New York in 1919 but divorced in 1922. Amy Ashwood was a very active Pan-Africanist, social worker and activist for women’s rights.

3. Marcus Mosiah Garvey’s second wife was Amy Jacques Garvey (1895-1973). They married in New York in 1922 after his divorce. Continue reading