Review Hidden Figures

Hidden Figures (@HiddenFigures) | TwitterHidden Figures: One official story

By Joanne Laurier, 12 January 2017

Hidden Figures, directed by Theodore Melfi, screenplay by Melfi and Allison Schroeder, based on the book by Margot Lee Shetterly

Hidden Figures
Directed by Theodore Melfi, Hidden Figures recounts the story of three brilliant African-American female scientists who made extraordinary contributions to NASA—the National Aeronautics and Space Administration—in the 1960s. The movie is based on the book by Margot Lee Shetterly, Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race.

The film centers on Katherine Goble Johnson (born 1918), a physicist and mathematician who excelled in computerized celestial navigation for Project Mercury, the first US human spaceflight program (including the flights of Alan Shepard and John Glenn) from 1958 through 1963, the 1969 Apollo 11 flight to the Moon and the Space Shuttle program. She was also involved in the early plans for a mission to Mars. Continue reading

Advertisements

Sherman Educates on the Difference Between Persona and Self

richard-sherman-seahwaks-nfl-adderall-vancouver-sunBlack In America: Thug Life – Richard Sherman Style
By Angriest Black Man In America, Black In America Series, Jan. 24 2014

The Story

So…suffice it to say I have a new hero: Richard Sherman. I am actually not a football fan. Honestly, I dislike the sport for its aggressive barbaric nature and some other ideological crap most people don’t care about. However, I don’t think anyone could have missed the media storm that was caused by Richard Sherman’s post-game interview on the field after his team’s win against the 49ers.

Richard Sherman Continue reading

An Old School Review of Fallen

Fallen

Fallen
From movieguide.com

Release Date: January 16, 1998
Starring: Denzel Washington, John Goodman, Donald Sutherland
Genre: Horror
Runtime: 120 minutes

Content:
Biblical worldview admitting God the creator, but focusing on fallen angels & demons, with some Christian references & some occult references; 49 obscenities & 4 profanities; extensive violence including man gassed in gas chamber, men shot, fights, dead bodies in bathtubs, men killed by lethal injections; no sex; glimpses of nude corpses but no private parts; alcohol use & abuse; drug use; cigarettes laced with poison; and, theological Continue reading

Moving On to Precious’ Balls

PreciousThe crotch-scattering movie poster of Precious

Is ‘Precious’ the Next ‘Monster’s Ball’?
By Valerie C. Gilbert (2009)

Precious: Based on the Novel Push by Sapphire
Director: Lee Daniels
Cast: Gabourey Sidibe, Mo’Nique, Lenny Kravitz, Paula Patton, Mariah Carey, Sherri Shepherd
(Lionsgate; US theatrical: 6 Nov 2009; 2009)

When it comes to Hollywood and representation of African-American women, I propose that the present decade might be viewed as beginning with Monster’s Ball (2001) and ending with Precious: Based on the Novel ‘Push’ By Sapphire (2009). The two films have much in common.  First, there is Lee Daniels, the producer who, for years, fought tirelessly to bring Monster’s Ball to the screen. Continue reading

Message In the Monster’s Balls

Image result for monsters ballsA Monster Love
By Esther Iverem (2002)

“Monster’s Ball” tries to convince us, in a raw, depressing Southern gothic style, that a Black woman in a small Georgia town will turn to a White man, who is an open racist, for sexual comfort and companionship. It also tells us that a racist will release his hatred when confronted with personal tragedy and the unexpected attention of a pretty, young Black woman. Beneath these two ideas is the old theme that love—even if it really is something else, like neediness or convenience—redeems and conquers all. Continue reading

Why Watch A Teen Bop Movie?

Josie and the Pussycats: Blueprint of the Mind Control Music Industry
By Vigilantcitizen.com, 2011

“Josie and the Pussycats” is a “girl band movie” aimed at children and young adolescents, especially young girls. At first glance, the flick seems to be one of those generic, God-awful teen movies. However, a closer look reveals how its overall tone and message are in sharp contrast to stereotypes of the genre. “Josie and the Pussycats” is indeed an acerbic critique of a morally bankrupt music industry. The most surprising thing about this 2001 movie is its frighteningly accurate predictions regarding today’s pop music and its Illuminati agenda: mind controlled artists, hypnotized masses, subliminal messages… it’s all there. This article will examine the movie’s themes and their relation to today’s music business context. Continue reading