Ben Hausa Ali – White Playing Hausa With Arabs

BREAKING News: Boko Haram Leader, Abubakar Shekau Claims ...THE MEMOIRS OF ABD-ALLAH AL-GHADEMISI OF KANO, 1903-1908.
PART I: THE BRITISH CONQUEST OF KANO
By MUHAMMAD SANI UMAR AND JOHN HUNWICK, in: Sudanic Africa, 7, 1996, 61-96

These native servants are the quintessence of loyalty, and devotion, and as time goes on, I am to find out that without them Nigeria would have been untenable by the white man. – F.P. Crozier, Five Years Hard, London 1932, 72-3.

Introduction
Some time in 1902 a young man named Abd-Allah arrived in Kano, ‘from the north’, presumably from Ghadames. We know nothing of the circumstances of his arrival, or of his ancestry. The document translated below is currently our only source of information on him. In it he describes himself as a ‘student’, but it is not clear in what sense he uses that term. There is no indication that he came to Kano to study, but we know that some years later he was acting as a clerk for his paternal uncles in Kano, who were evidently merchants. Continue reading

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Old Nubian Ethiop

Gallery For > Kush Kingdom MapWonderful Ethiopians of the Ancient Cushite Empire

By Drusilla Dunjee Houston, 1926 [Edited]

This is a pioneering, long-lost, work of Afrocentric history. Drusilla Dunjee Houston, (1876-1941) was a teacher, journalist and self-taught historian. Houston undertook a life-long quest to discover African history from an African-American perspective. However, at the time that Houston wrote, history was viewed through a Eurocentric perspective.

CHAPTER II. OLD ETHIOPIA–ITS PEOPLE.

The Greeks looked to old Ethiopia and called the Upper Nile the common cradle of mankind. Toward the rich luxury of this region they looked for the “Garden of Eden.” From these people of the Upper Nile arose the oldest traditions and rites and from them sprang the first colonies and arts of antiquity. The Greeks also said that Egyptians derived their civilization and religion from Ethiopia. “Egyptian religion was not an original conception, for three thousand years ago she had lost all true sense of its real meaning among even the priesthood.” Continue reading

The Spirit of Irene Morgan

alignleftIrene Morgan Kirkaldy (1917 – 2007)
From Maryland Women’s Hall of Fame

In July 1944, Irene Morgan Kirkaldy made a courageous decision that would turn into one of the first major advancements in the American Civil Rights Movement. Kirkaldy was born on April 9, 1917, in Baltimore, Maryland.

On a July morning in 1944, Kirkaldy, recovering from a miscarriage, boarded a Greyhound bus in Gloucester, Virginia, to return to her home in Baltimore. She selected a seat in a section of the back of the bus designated for black passengers. A half hour into the trip, a white couple boarded the crowded bus and the bus driver, under authority given to him by Jim Crow laws and segregation practices, demanded that Kirkaldy give up her seat. Continue reading

White Mind Dominating Black News

Fake smile Odd StuffWhen Black News Disappears: White Holds on Black Intellectuals’ Minds and Misinforming the Black Public
Friday, 24 May 2013 09:49By Dr Tommy J Curry, Racism Review | Op-Ed

As an historical entity, the Black press has not only offered critical commentaries and political critiques of the sempiternal racism of the modern world, but correctives as to how white newspapers, opinion-makers, legislators, and most importantly the white public sought to justify their complacency towards and support for anti-Black racism and the sexual brutalization of Black men, women, and children. Today, however, the post-Obama lullabies of racial détente and the progressive liberal passivity of Black intellectuals have allowed the structural Continue reading

Prester John – Fountain of Youth

John Prester_AF El Preste Juan; Emperador de los Abisinios, Pierre-Antoine Demachy

Did a Black Man Discover the Fountain of Youth?
100 Amazing Facts About the Negro: Learn about the legend that predates Ponce de León’s legendary search.
By Henry Louis Gates Jr., Dec. 23 2013

Amazing Fact About the Negro No. 61: What myth of eternal youth in Africa inspired Europeans for centuries?

Whenever he encountered a counterintuitive fact, my mother’s brother, my Uncle Ed, was fond of saying, “That’s another one of those things that ‘they’ just don’t tell us,” as if key bits of information about the order of things were systematically being withheld from black people. At the top of my own list of things we weren’t told in school is the fact that the legendary Fountain of Youth was not only Continue reading

The Art of Thieves

The pair statue from the Tomb of Ikhetneb has lost most of its original paint on the faces and upper body of the two images, while much of the original paint on the legs and feet still survive. It seems evident that the darker paint has been deliberately erased on the face and upper body, thus giving the images the illusion of a white-skin appearance.

THE VANISHING EVIDENCE OF CLASSICAL  AFRICAN  CIVILIZATIONS:
“A 2001 Update”
By Prof. Manu Ampim

The “Vanishing Evidence” series is a general summary of years of detailed observation and research.  The full documentation supporting the conclusions expressed in this series of articles, including dozens of photographs, will be published in my forthcoming book, Continue reading

African National Congress

Zulu-fication of the ANC brings financial sunshine to KZNThe African National Congress (ANC)

On January 8, 1912, The African National Congress (ANC) was founded with the aid of W. E. B. Du Bois. It began as a nonviolent civil rights organization that worked to promote the interests of  Africans. With a mostly middle-class constituency, the ANC stressed constitutional means of change through the use of delegations, petitions, and peaceful protest.

In 1940 Alfred B. Xuma became ANC president and began recruiting younger, more outspoken members. Among the new recruits were Nelson Mandela, Oliver Tambo, and Walter Sisulu, who helped found the ANC’s Youth League in 1944 and who soon became the organization’s leading members. ANC membership greatly increased in the 1950s after South Africa’s white-minority government began to implement apartheid, a policy of rigid racial segregation under a white supremacy system, in 1948. Continue reading