A Christian Slave Boy – Ch 2

CrowtherSamuel Crowther
The Slave Boy Who Became Bishop of the Niger
By Jesse Page (1892)

Part -> 1

Chapter II. A Childhood of Slavery

HAVING now glanced at Africa as a whole, we will set our foot upon the banks of the lordly Niger, which will be the scene of the wonderful story of God’s providence and grace which this volume seeks to tell. This river, second only in depth and importance to the Nile, cannot boast of a like classic history; but it is now full of memories of faithful work and endeavour, none the less valuable or interesting that they pertain to the present century. Continue reading

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A Christian Slave Boy – Ch 1

CrowtherSamuel Crowther
The Slave Boy Who Became Bishop of the Niger
By Jesse Page (1892)

Chapter I. The Home-Land of the Slave

FOR centuries the history of Africa has been the mystery and sorrow of the world. Up to a time still fresh in the memory of our grandfathers the map of the Dark Continent, dark in more senses than one, gave little trouble to the schoolboy, being simply an irregular coast-line enclosing wide spaces in blank, trespassed upon by lines of almost guess-work boundaries, and in the middle thereof sundry high places denoted by the romantic title of the Mountains of the Moon. Continue reading

Christian Slavery – Letter X

Re-lie-zionFrom American Scenes, Christian Slavery
by Ebenezer Davies

Part -> 1, 2, 3

Letter X

At the close I introduced myself to the minister as Davies, from British Guiana, attached to the ministry of the missionaries of the London Society. He was very kind and cordial, and pressed my wife and myself to go home with him to tea. We accepted the invitation.

Among other questions, he asked how our negroes worked, now that they were free? I told him, “Very well indeed; and you may very safely venture to emancipate your slaves as soon as you please.” This led us at once _in medias res_. His views I found to be simply as follows: how pious! how plausible! how convenient! how extensively prevalent in reference to other evils than slavery! Continue reading

Christian Slavery – Letter VI, VII and IX

Re-lie-zionFrom American Scenes, Christian Slavery
by Ebenezer Davies

Par -> 1, 2

Letter VI

In consequence of the following advertisement in the _Picayune_, I screwed up my feelings, and resolved for once at least in my life to see a slave-auction. I was the more disposed to attend this, as it was distinctly stated that they would be sold in families. I should not therefore have to behold the wife torn away from the husband, the husband from the wife, the parent from the child, or the child from the parent, as is so commonly done.

“COTTON-FIELD HANDS.–By Beard, Calhoun, and Co., auctioneers.–Will be sold at auction, on Friday, the 5th inst., at 12 o’clock, at Bank’s Arcade, thirty-seven Field Slaves; comprising eighteen from one plantation, and fourteen from another. All acclimated Negroes. To be sold in Families. Full particulars at sale.” Continue reading

Christian Slavery – Letter III

Re-lie-zionFrom American Scenes, and Christian Slavery
by Ebenezer Davies

Part -> 1

Letter III

Here we are (thought I) in New Orleans–the metropolis of a great slave country,–a town in which exist many depots for the disposal of human beings,–the very city where, a few months ago, poor Pauline was sacrificed as the victim of lust and cruelty! Unhappy girl! What a tragedy! On the 1st of August last, I told the horrid tale to my emancipated people in Berbice. Here it is, as extracted from the _Essex_ (United States) _Transcript_. Read it, if you please; and then you will have a notion of the feelings with which I contemplated a city rendered infamous by such a transaction. Continue reading

Christian Slavery – Letter II

Re-lie-zionFrom American Scenes, and Christian Slavery
by Ebenezer Davies

Letter II

From some of the officers, our captain obtained another newspaper. It was the _New Orleans Daily Picayune_ for January 26. Getting hold of it, I found whole columns of slave-sale advertisements. A few specimens will illustrate better than any description the state of things in this “land of liberty!”

“NEGROES FOR SALE.–The subscribers No. 56, Esplanade-street, have just received a lot of valuable Slaves from Virginia and Maryland, consisting of Mechanics, Farm Hands, and House Servants, and have made _arrangements not to be surpassed_ in this market for a _regular supply_ from the above markets, as also Alabama. We hazard nothing in saying, if our former friends, and others wishing to purchase good servants or hands, will give us a call, they shall not be disappointed. Continue reading