Map for the Theft of Territory

Story of Iu-zeus

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Alive In Death

sam-mosher-lois-greenfield-1995Alive in Death
By Sekhemu, 2006

The words “death” and “the dead” are used in the old scriptures to refer to living humanity in earthly embodiment. We scurrying mortals are the “dead” of the bible and other sacred books, but it is past our prerogative to read a meaning into their books other than the one they intended; or to read out of them a meaning consistently deposited therein. It is perhaps the cardinal item of the whole theological corpus, the real “lost key” to a correct reading of the subterranean meaning in esoteric literature. In ancient theology “death” means our life on earth.

Be the figure apt or be it considered unthinkable- as it will be at first by many- the texts of scripture will yield their cryptic meaning on no other terms. And the Bible is a sealed book mostly because of those words, “death” and “the dead” have not been read as covers of a far profounder sense than the superficial one. Continue reading

Abra’m Lincoln and Slavery

I can conceive of no greater calamity than the assimilation of the Negro into our social and political life as our equal.
Attributed to ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

Before the American Civil War and even on the war’s early stages Lincoln said that the Constitution prohibited the federal government from abolishing slavery in states where it already existed. His position and the position of the Republican Party in 1860 was that slavery should not be allowed to expand into any more territories, and thus all future states admitted to the Union would be free states.

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Black Character Assassination

bulls-eye-black-man.jpg Black Character Assassination
By Black Sentinel (2007)

Constantly I feel that we are being bombarded with images that are designed to connect Blacks with the ills of society. Each and every night on local and national news you see the same types of images being flashed across the screen. Black faces shown for topics such as welfare reform, crime statistics, unemployment, ill education and you name it a stock photo of a Black is associated with it. So basically what you have is Pavlov’s experiment using people. If you have not taken psychology 101 then Pavlov’s experiment was to ring a bell each time a dog was given food and soon enough the dog would start to salivate just from hearing the bell. The dog learned to associate eating with the bell. Just like Pavlov’s dog, people begin to associate Black people with crime, welfare, laziness and stupidity. So now just by hearing the term welfare recipients…I am sure your mind pictured a bunch of young, single Black females. Continue reading

Message In the Monster’s Balls

Image result for monsters ballsA Monster Love
By Esther Iverem (2002)

“Monster’s Ball” tries to convince us, in a raw, depressing Southern gothic style, that a Black woman in a small Georgia town will turn to a White man, who is an open racist, for sexual comfort and companionship. It also tells us that a racist will release his hatred when confronted with personal tragedy and the unexpected attention of a pretty, young Black woman. Beneath these two ideas is the old theme that love—even if it really is something else, like neediness or convenience—redeems and conquers all. Continue reading

Cannot Fool All Of Us All the Time

Their injustice leaves just us suffering. I will find out why they put miss Hill in jail. The IRS does not bite unless told to do so.
Why give her even more food for thought by showing her the injustice system from the inside out? There is nothing left to fear, but to educate her children so they are ready for what is still to come.
Her children? Yeah. Us.

Motives and Thoughts
By Lauryn Hill

June 10, 2005 Def Poetry Jam – HBO

Rotating bodies, confusion of sound
Negative imagery, holding us down Continue reading

Carter Godwin Woodson

Carter Godwin WoodsonCarter Godwin Woodson: Committed Black Historian

African-American writer, educator, and historian Carter Godwin Woodson was born December 19, 1875. From a poor family in Buckingham County, Virginia, Woodson supported himself by working in the coal mines of Kentucky as a teenager and as a consequence was unable to enroll in high school until he was 20. After graduating in fewer than two years, he taught high school, wrote articles, studied at home and abroad, and received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1912. Woodson also studied at Berea College and the University of Chicago.

He was dean of the School of Liberal Arts at Howard University Continue reading