Henson’s Cabin

Is the birthplace of ‘Uncle Tom’ in a Maryland hayfield?
By Joe Heim June 15, 2016

The archaeological finds seem ordinary at first. A rusted belt buckle, shards of broken pottery and glass, remnants of an old clay pipe.

But in this detritus of lives lived more than 200 years ago on a southern Maryland farm known as La Grange, researchers in Charles County believe they have uncovered the birthplace of a key figure in African American history.

Josiah Henson is not a household name, but the autobiography the former slave published in 1849 provided integral source material — and some say inspired the title character — for Harriet Beecher Stowe’s “Uncle Continue reading

Josiah Henson

Excerpt: ‘The Autobiography of Josiah Henson’
By Josiah Henson

I was born, June 15, 1789, in Charles County, Maryland, on a farm belonging to Mr. Francis N., about a mile from Port Tobacco. My mother was the property of Dr. Josiah McP., but was hired by Mr. N., to whom my father belonged. The only incident I can remember, which occurred while my mother continued on N.’s farm, was the appearance of my father one day, with his head bloody and his back lacerated. He was in a state of great excitement, and though it was all a mystery to me at the age of three or four years, it was explained at a later period, and I understood that he had been suffering the cruel penalty of the Maryland law for beating a white man. His right ear had been cut off close to his head, and he had received a hundred lashes on his back. He had beaten the overseer for a brutal assault on my mother, and this was his punishment. Furious at such treatment, my father became a different man, and was so morose, disobedient, and intractable, that Mr. N. determined to sell him. He accordingly parted with him, not long after, to his son, who lived in Alabama; and neither my mother nor I, ever heard of him again. He was naturally, as I understood afterwards from my mother and other persons, a man of amiable temper, and of considerable energy of character; but it is not strange that he should be essentially changed by such cruelty and injustice under the sanction of law. Continue reading

Lock Down Pineal

imageKEE ZODI: “The Power of the Pineal Gland and How It’s Being Suppressed
By thewelshtruthseeker, June 26 2016

The pineal gland (also called the pineal body, epiphysis cerebri, epiphysis or the “third eye”) is a small endocrine gland in the vertebrate brain. It produces the serotonin derivative melatonin, a hormone that affects the modulation of wake/sleep patterns and seasonal functions. Its shape resembles a tiny pine cone (hence its name), and it is located near the center of the brain, between the two hemispheres, tucked in a groove where the two rounded thalamic bodies join.

The Secret : What they don’t want you to KNOW!

Every human being’s Pineal Gland or The third eye can be activated to spiritual world frequencies and enables you to have the sense of all knowing, godlike euphoria and oneness all around you. A pineal gland once tuned into to proper frequencies with help of meditation, yoga or various esoteric, occult methods, enables a person to travel into other dimensions, popularly known as astral travel or astral projection or remote viewing. Continue reading

Beast of Ego

Fine Art - pixiportWhat is Ego?
By Metaphysics (2008)

“I live, yet not I, but the inner Christ [HERU = heart consciousness] – the eternal Logos – liveth in me. ” (Gal 2:20).

“This blog photo recalls an old Zen story, about a lion who was brought up by sheep and who thought he was a sheep until an old lion captured him and took him to a pond, where he showed him his own reflection. Many of us are like this lion-the image we have of ourselves comes not from our own direct experience, but from the opinions of others. A ‘personality’ imposed from the outside replaces the individuality that could have grown from within. We become just another sheep in the herd, unable to move freely, and unconscious of our own true identity.” -Zen Tarot

The first thing to be understood is what ego is. Continue reading

Black Leadership

New Ancient Queen (Black Is Beautiful)Instructions: 26 Characteristics of Great Leaders
By Zion – University of KMT

1) Study, master the fundamentals of every area of life and living.

2) Be clear on principles. Never straddle the fence. Never sell your soul. Set high standards. In doing so, you will be better able to know how to deal with others, various people and in various situations.

3) Seriously understand what you are up against. Know what time it is, what conditions you face, what you have and what they have. Prepare meticulously. African people have generally not taken revolution seriously, nor have we taken seriously what must be done to correct our historic problem. Continue reading

Horror White on Reparations

Ashkenazi Slave SneakersDavid Horowitz on Slavery: “Where’s the Gratitude?”
By Reggie Dylan, 2007

David Horowitz is a right wing, supposedly “intellectual” hit-man in the forefront of the attack on dissent and critical thinking in academia. He is the author of the October 22–26 so-called Islamo-Fascism Awareness Week (IFAW) on campuses around the U.S. and in Israel.

A foundational element in Horowitz’s agenda is his demand that academia rule out of order and suppress the investigation of, or the teaching of, the truth about the horrors of slavery and the present-day oppression of African Americans. This needs to be called out, exposed, and refuted in the course of this “Week.” Continue reading

Skeleton Key

Skeleton Key - imdbThe Skeleton Key

The Skeleton Key is a 2005 American supernatural horror film starring Kate Hudson, Gena Rowlands, John Hurt, Peter Sarsgaard, and Joy Bryant. The film centers on a young hospice nurse who acquires a job at a Terrebonne Parish plantation home, and becomes entangled in a supernatural mystery involving the house, its former inhabitants, and the hoodoo rituals and spells that took place there. It was released in cinemas in the United Kingdom on July 29, 2005, and in the U.S. on August 12, 2005.

Plot
Caroline Ellis (Kate Hudson), is a New Orleans nurse who takes a position as a private hospice caregiver at an isolated plantation house deep in the bayous of southern Louisiana. The lady of the house Violet Devereaux (Gena Rowlands), looks after her husband Benjamin Devereaux (John Hurt). With some prompting from the family’s estate lawyer, Luke Marshall (Peter Sarsgaard), she accepts the position. Continue reading