Winnie Mandela and Coretta Scott King

Slide 19 of 26: In this Sept. 11, 1986, file photo, Winnie Mandela, left, wife of jailed African National Congress leader Nelson Mandela is joined by Coretta Scott King, widow of American civil rights leader Dr Martin Luther King Jr., in Soweto.

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The World Failed Winnie Mandela

 

Its been a while since I spoke about anything here on this blog. Well I am back and today we talking about mama Winnie Mandela. A fallen hero, champion to the Nation, to Black South Africans. Today is not about me though but about a thread that I saw on twitter regarding Winnie and the […]

via S. A failed Winnie Mandela — Pascal Marima

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Rest In Power – Winnie Madikizela-Mandela

Morreu Winnie Mandela, ex-mulher de Nelson Mandela ...

Winnie Madikizela-Mandela: The world reacts to the death of a lioness
By Rebecca Davis and Bheki Simelane, 02 Apr 2018

Easter Monday saw the death of a South African woman so famous she could be referred to by just one name: Winnie. In the hours following the confirmation of Winnie Madikizela-Mandela’s passing at 81, tributes and reaction locally and from around the world poured in to honour the anti-apartheid icon. Continue reading

Panama Society

Panama – The Society and Its Environment

PANAMANIAN SOCIETY OF the 1980s reflected the country’s unusual geographical position as a transit zone. Panama’s role as a crossing point had long subjected the isthmus to a variety of outside influences not typically associated with Central and South-America. The population included Asian, European, North American and Middle Eastern immigrants and their offspring, who came to Panama to take advantage of the commercial opportunities connected with the Panama Canal.

African Antilleans, descendants of African Caribbean laborers who worked on the construction of the canal, formed the largest single minority group; as English-speaking diverse group, they were set apart from the majority by both language and religion. Tribal Indians, often isolated from the larger society, constituted roughly 5 percent of the population in the 1980s. They were distinguished by language, their indigenous belief systems, and a variety of other cultural practices. Continue reading

Jamaica Policy

Flippa Mafia / Moggla, Busted In International Drug RingThe Drug trade and Jamaica’s national security
From Davor Bailey, 2013 (Edited)

In order to assess the notion that illegal drug trafficking or trade poses a security threat, we must first define what exactly illegal drug trade is and what security is.

The illegal drug trade is a global black market, dedicated to cultivation, manufacturing, distribution, and sale of those substances which are subject to drug prohibition laws. (drugrehab.co.uk)

As for security, traditional realism views it purely in the military sense; however with the closer of the cold war, there as arisen some criticism to this view. What has occurred as a result is a shift from this narrow perception of security to a more multidimensional and expanded concept; what is known a neo-realism. Continue reading

Panama Canal

the Panama Canal http://photios.blogspot.com/2006/03/chinese-and-panama-canal.htmlBuilding the Panama Canal

In 1519 the Spanish Governor Pedrarias the Cruel, moved his capital away from the debilitating climate and unfriendly AmerIndians of the Darién to a fishing village on the Pacific coast called Panama, meaning “plenty of fish.” It was resettled and until the end of the sixteenth century served as the Caribbean port for trans-isthmian traffic. A trail known as the Camino Real, or royal road, linked Panama and Nombre de Dios. Along this trail, traces of which can still be followed, gold from Peru was carried by muleback to Spanish galleons waiting on the Atlantic coast.

The increasing importance of the isthmus for transporting treasure and the delay and difficulties posed by the Camino Real inspired surveys ordered by the Spanish crown in the 1520s and 1530s to ascertain the feasibility of constructing a canal. The idea was finally abandoned Continue reading

Canal of the Pa-Heru

 
Canals for Shipping in ancient EgyptCanal of the Pharaohs

The Canal of the Pharaohs, also called the Ancient Suez Canal or Necho’s Canal, is the forerunner of the Suez Canal, constructed in ancient times. It followed a different course than its modern counterpart, by linking the Nile to the Red Sea via the Wadi Tumilat. The canal was again constructed under Nekau (Necho II), in the late 6th century BCE.

In the second half of the 19th century CE, French cartographers discovered the remnants of the north–south section of Darius Canal past the east side of Lake Timsah and ending near the north end of the Great Bitter Lake. Work began under the Pharaohs, but according to the later Suez Inscriptions and Herodotus, the first opening of the canal was under Persian king Darius. Continue reading