Jamaica Policy

Flippa Mafia / Moggla, Busted In International Drug RingThe Drug trade and Jamaica’s national security
From Davor Bailey, 2013 (Edited)

In order to assess the notion that illegal drug trafficking or trade poses a security threat, we must first define what exactly illegal drug trade is and what security is.

The illegal drug trade is a global black market, dedicated to cultivation, manufacturing, distribution, and sale of those substances which are subject to drug prohibition laws. (drugrehab.co.uk)

As for security, traditional realism views it purely in the military sense; however with the closer of the cold war, there as arisen some criticism to this view. What has occurred as a result is a shift from this narrow perception of security to a more multidimensional and expanded concept; what is known a neo-realism. Continue reading

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Garvey Said, Let There Be…

Philosophy and Opinions OF MARCUS GARVEY


CHAPTER II


PROPAGANDA

        We are living in a civilization that is highly developed.  We are living in a world that is scientifically arranged in which everything done by those who control is done through system; proper arrangement, proper organization, and among some of the organized methods used to control the world is the thing known and called “PROPAGANDA.”
Propaganda has done more to defeat the good intentions of races and nations than even open warfare.
Propaganda is a method or medium used by organized peoples to convert others against their will.
We of the Negro race are suffering more than any other race in the world from propaganda – Propaganda to destroy our hopes, our ambitions and our confidence in self.
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Ideas for Marcus Garvey

Marcus Garvey25 Facts about Marcus Mosiah Garvey

1. Marcus Mosiah Garvey Jnr was born on 17 August 1887 in St Ann’s Bay, Jamaica. His parents were Malcus Mosiah Garvey Snr, a stone mason and Sarah Jane Richards, a domestic worker. The Garvey’s had 11 children, nine of whom died in early childhood. Only Marcus Garvey and his eldest sister Indiana lived to adulthood.

2. Marcus Mosiah Garvey’s first wife was Amy Ashwood Garvey (1897-1969). They married in New York in 1919 but divorced in 1922. Amy Ashwood was a very active Pan-Africanist, social worker and activist for women’s rights.

3. Marcus Mosiah Garvey’s second wife was Amy Jacques Garvey (1895-1973). They married in New York in 1922 after his divorce. Continue reading

Marcus Mosiah Garvey

Marcus GarveyMarcus Garvey
Civil Rights Activist (1887–1940)

[Edited]

“Hungry men have no respect for law, authority or human life.” – —Marcus Garvey

Born in Jamaica, Marcus Garvey worked for the Black Nationalism and Pan-Africanism movements, to which end he co-founded the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA) and African Communities League, dedicated to promoting African-Americans and resettlement in Africa. He promoted a separate black nation. Garvey advanced a Pan-African philosophy which inspired the movement known as Garveyism. Garvey would eventually inspire others, from the Nation of Islam to the Rastafari movement.

Early Life

Marcus Mosiah Garvey, Jr. was born on August 17, 1887, in St. Ann’s Bay, Jamaica. Marcus Garvey was the last of 11 children born to Marcus Garvey, Sr. and Sarah Jane Richards. His father was a stone mason, and his mother a domestic worker and farmer.

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Bernie Mac

Bernie MacBernie Mac
Comedian, Actor (1957–2008)

Bernie Mac was a standup comedian and actor on film and television known for his “Bernie Mac Show” and appearance in the “Ocean’s 11” films.

Early Life

Actor and comedian Bernie Mac was born Bernard Jeffrey McCullough on October 5, 1957, in Chicago, Illinois. Growing up in a large family on Chicago’s South Side, his grandfather was the deacon of a Baptist church.Mac performed his first standup routine at the age of eight, impersonating his grandparents at the dinner table for the church congregation.

After losing his mother to cancer (his brother, father and grandmother died not long after), Mac realized the healing power of laughter. He began telling jokes for spare change in the Chicago subway. While working various odd jobs, he eventually established his own weekly variety show at Chicago’s Regal Theatre and joined the comedy club circuit in 1977.

Acting Debut

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Slave Comey

Image result for slavery custom dutiesImport Duty on Slaves [13 May 1789]

Parker moved to fix a duty of ten dollars on each enslaved African brought into the United States. Some congressmen who were sympathetic with Parker’s object preferred a separate bill on imports of enslaved Africans.

Mr. Madison. I cannot concur with gentlemen who think the present an improper time or place to enter into a discussion of the proposed motion; if it is taken up in a separate view, we shall do the same thing at a greater expence of time. But the gentleman says that it is improper to connect the two objects, because they do not come within the title of the bill; but this objection may be obviated by accommodating the title to the contents; there may be some inconsistency in combining the ideas which gentlemen have expressed, that is, considering the human race as a species of property; but the evil does not arise from adopting the clause now proposed; it is from the importation to which it relates. Our object in enumerating persons on paper with merchandize, is to prevent the practice of actually treating them as such, by having them in future, forming part of the cargoes of goods, wares, and merchandize to be imported into the United States, the motion is calculated to avoid the very evil intimated by the gentleman. Continue reading

Slavery and American Policing

A Brief History of Slavery and the Origins of American Policing
Written by Victor E. Kappeler, Ph.D., Eastern Kentucky University

The birth and development of the American police can be traced to a multitude of historical, legal and political-economic conditions. The institution of slavery and the control of minorities, however, were two of the more formidable historic features of American society shaping early policing. Slave patrols and Night Watches, which later became modern police departments, were both designed to control the behaviors of minorities. For example, New England settlers appointed Indian Constables to police Native Americans (National Constable Association, 1995), the St. Louis police were founded to protect residents from Native Americans in that frontier city, and many southern police departments began as slave patrols.

In 1704, the colony of Carolina developed the nation’s first slave patrol. Slave patrols helped to maintain the economic order and to assist the wealthy landowners in recovering and punishing slaves who essentially were considered property. Continue reading