Winnie Mandela and Coretta Scott King

Slide 19 of 26: In this Sept. 11, 1986, file photo, Winnie Mandela, left, wife of jailed African National Congress leader Nelson Mandela is joined by Coretta Scott King, widow of American civil rights leader Dr Martin Luther King Jr., in Soweto.

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The World Failed Winnie Mandela

 

Its been a while since I spoke about anything here on this blog. Well I am back and today we talking about mama Winnie Mandela. A fallen hero, champion to the Nation, to Black South Africans. Today is not about me though but about a thread that I saw on twitter regarding Winnie and the […]

via S. A failed Winnie Mandela — Pascal Marima

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Rest In Power – Winnie Madikizela-Mandela

Morreu Winnie Mandela, ex-mulher de Nelson Mandela ...

Winnie Madikizela-Mandela: The world reacts to the death of a lioness
By Rebecca Davis and Bheki Simelane, 02 Apr 2018

Easter Monday saw the death of a South African woman so famous she could be referred to by just one name: Winnie. In the hours following the confirmation of Winnie Madikizela-Mandela’s passing at 81, tributes and reaction locally and from around the world poured in to honour the anti-apartheid icon. Continue reading

Canal of the Pa-Heru

 
Canals for Shipping in ancient EgyptCanal of the Pharaohs

The Canal of the Pharaohs, also called the Ancient Suez Canal or Necho’s Canal, is the forerunner of the Suez Canal, constructed in ancient times. It followed a different course than its modern counterpart, by linking the Nile to the Red Sea via the Wadi Tumilat. The canal was again constructed under Nekau (Necho II), in the late 6th century BCE.

In the second half of the 19th century CE, French cartographers discovered the remnants of the north–south section of Darius Canal past the east side of Lake Timsah and ending near the north end of the Great Bitter Lake. Work began under the Pharaohs, but according to the later Suez Inscriptions and Herodotus, the first opening of the canal was under Persian king Darius. Continue reading

Mimic of the Originals

Statue of Liberty Egypt5 things you didn’t know about the Suez Canal
By Nina Awad, 2015

On Nov. 17, 1869, the historic Suez Canal officially started operating and forever changed international shipping by allowing vessels to sail through 101 mile long waterway. The Suez Canal took a little more than 15 years to be planned and built. The construction was repeatedly interrupted by political disputes, shortages in laborers and a cholera outbreak.

Check out these fascinating facts about the Suez Canal.

1. The idea of a canal originated from ancient Egypt

According to History In The Headlines, the Suez Canal is one of the most recent of multiple man-made waterways in Egypt. Senusret III, an ancient Egyptian Pharaoh, reportedly built a canal to connect the Red Sea and the Nile River in 1850 B.C. Another Egyptian Pharaoh, Necho II, and the Persian conqueror Darius began and later abandoned work on a similar project. Continue reading

Ben Hausa Ali – White Playing Hausa With Arabs

BREAKING News: Boko Haram Leader, Abubakar Shekau Claims ...THE MEMOIRS OF ABD-ALLAH AL-GHADEMISI OF KANO, 1903-1908.
PART I: THE BRITISH CONQUEST OF KANO
By MUHAMMAD SANI UMAR AND JOHN HUNWICK, in: Sudanic Africa, 7, 1996, 61-96

These native servants are the quintessence of loyalty, and devotion, and as time goes on, I am to find out that without them Nigeria would have been untenable by the white man. – F.P. Crozier, Five Years Hard, London 1932, 72-3.

Introduction
Some time in 1902 a young man named Abd-Allah arrived in Kano, ‘from the north’, presumably from Ghadames. We know nothing of the circumstances of his arrival, or of his ancestry. The document translated below is currently our only source of information on him. In it he describes himself as a ‘student’, but it is not clear in what sense he uses that term. There is no indication that he came to Kano to study, but we know that some years later he was acting as a clerk for his paternal uncles in Kano, who were evidently merchants. Continue reading