Winnie Mandela and Coretta Scott King

Slide 19 of 26: In this Sept. 11, 1986, file photo, Winnie Mandela, left, wife of jailed African National Congress leader Nelson Mandela is joined by Coretta Scott King, widow of American civil rights leader Dr Martin Luther King Jr., in Soweto.

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The World Failed Winnie Mandela

 

Its been a while since I spoke about anything here on this blog. Well I am back and today we talking about mama Winnie Mandela. A fallen hero, champion to the Nation, to Black South Africans. Today is not about me though but about a thread that I saw on twitter regarding Winnie and the […]

via S. A failed Winnie Mandela — Pascal Marima

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Rest In Power – Winnie Madikizela-Mandela

Morreu Winnie Mandela, ex-mulher de Nelson Mandela ...

Winnie Madikizela-Mandela: The world reacts to the death of a lioness
By Rebecca Davis and Bheki Simelane, 02 Apr 2018

Easter Monday saw the death of a South African woman so famous she could be referred to by just one name: Winnie. In the hours following the confirmation of Winnie Madikizela-Mandela’s passing at 81, tributes and reaction locally and from around the world poured in to honour the anti-apartheid icon. Continue reading

Panama Elite

Panamá despliega 300 nuevos agentes de elite para reforzar ...Panama – The Oligarchy under Fire

In the mid-1960s, the oligarchy was still tenuously in charge of Panama’s political system. Members of the middle class, consisting largely of teachers and government workers, occasionally gained political prominence. Aspiring to upper-class stations, they failed to unite with the lower classes to displace the oligarchy. Students were the most vocal element of the middle class and the group most disposed to speak for the uneducated poor; as graduates, however, they were generally coopted by the system.

A great chasm separated the rural section from the urban population of the two major cities. Only the rural wageworkers, concentrated in the provinces of Bocas del Toro and Chiriquí, appeared to follow events in the capital and to express themselves on issues of national policy. Among the urban lower classes, antagonism between the Spanish speakers and the English- and French-speaking African American and African Caribbean people inhibited organization in pursuit of common interests. Continue reading

Panama Society

Panama – The Society and Its Environment

PANAMANIAN SOCIETY OF the 1980s reflected the country’s unusual geographical position as a transit zone. Panama’s role as a crossing point had long subjected the isthmus to a variety of outside influences not typically associated with Central and South-America. The population included Asian, European, North American and Middle Eastern immigrants and their offspring, who came to Panama to take advantage of the commercial opportunities connected with the Panama Canal.

African Antilleans, descendants of African Caribbean laborers who worked on the construction of the canal, formed the largest single minority group; as English-speaking diverse group, they were set apart from the majority by both language and religion. Tribal Indians, often isolated from the larger society, constituted roughly 5 percent of the population in the 1980s. They were distinguished by language, their indigenous belief systems, and a variety of other cultural practices. Continue reading

Jamaica Policy

Flippa Mafia / Moggla, Busted In International Drug RingThe Drug trade and Jamaica’s national security
From Davor Bailey, 2013 (Edited)

In order to assess the notion that illegal drug trafficking or trade poses a security threat, we must first define what exactly illegal drug trade is and what security is.

The illegal drug trade is a global black market, dedicated to cultivation, manufacturing, distribution, and sale of those substances which are subject to drug prohibition laws. (drugrehab.co.uk)

As for security, traditional realism views it purely in the military sense; however with the closer of the cold war, there as arisen some criticism to this view. What has occurred as a result is a shift from this narrow perception of security to a more multidimensional and expanded concept; what is known a neo-realism. Continue reading

Intelligence Boosting News

Cuba Hopes Trump Keeps Cooperation Efforts against Drug ...DEA’s Latin ‘takedown’ boosted by dubious figures
BY LENNY SAVINO, The Miami Herald, February 1, 2001

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico — The Drug Enforcement Administration used suspect figures to tout the success of a 36-nation “major takedown” of drug traffickers in the Caribbean and Latin America last fall, according to an examination of the operation.

The DEA’s scorecard on “Operation Libertador” reported 2,876 arrests, but agency officials could not provide evidence to support hundreds of them. Hundreds more were routine busts for marijuana possession, and some drug eradication figures were double-counts of a State Department program to burn marijuana plants. And while the DEA said $30.2 million in criminal assets were seized during Libertador, $30 million of that was confiscated four weeks before the operation began. Continue reading